Photo contest: Show us your before and afters.

Thumbtack Employee dinal
Thumbtack Employee
1 2 553

Outerlands_Photography.jpg

Your profile photo is the very first thing customers look at: they see that profile photo lined up next to a whole lot of other pro photos in their search results. So a dark or blurry photo won’t get the job done. Your picture needs to be clear and look professional and friendly.

So this week we’re running a contest: show us the profile photo you started out with and then show us your new profile photo. Hit us with your very best before and after in the comments and you could win $100 in Thumbtack credit.

To get your best photo, here’s what you should do:

  • Show you (or your team). Customers like to put a face to your business and know who they’re working with.
  • Flash that smile. Looking friendly could be enough to get you that critical first click.
  • Use natural light. Instead of using a filter or flash, keep it bright with photos taken outside or by a window.
  • Shoot from your torso up. Your profile icon is pretty small, so anything shot from farther away won’t look great.

Here are a few before and after examples we took in the office today:

Screen Shot 2019-04-23 at 5.42.53 PM.png

If you're taking a selfie with your phone, make sure the camera lens is at eye level, and that you're looking straight ahead. 

Screen Shot 2019-04-23 at 5.43.10 PM.png

Make sure the light source is always in front of you, never behind you. 

Screen Shot 2019-04-23 at 5.44.33 PM.png

Avoid harsh light or shadows and position yourself in front of a solid, light backdrop. 

Check out the fine print for our contest here.

2 responses
FWPhotographer
Level 1

Oh, good grief, move away from the wall...

Moderator Kameron
Moderator

@FWPhotographer this is also a great tip. Thanks for pointing out and sharing!

About the Author
Hi. I'm Dina. I work and write for Thumbtack. Other interests include: reading, feeding my baby radishes, demanding that everyone know that my baby likes radishes, and considering and then declining exercise.