The no regrets tour: Exec turned caretaker turned coach

Community Manager TaylorS
Community Manager
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Deb Goldstein left a successful career to take care of her mom. Then she had to figure out what came next.

We are naturally comfortable with the “What” and “Where” of what we do. But it should start with the “Why”.

For the past 10 years I’ve been on a no regrets tour.

Before that I was a Division President at IDG. Many people know IDG for the self help For Dummies books. For a long time the business grew exponentially, but by 2006 the economy weakened and media was splintered. At the same time, my mother’s health started to decline.

So I left my job and took care of her full-time for five years. Caring for an elderly parent, or anyone, is a marathon. It was a horrible/wonderful thing. And I’d do it all over again.

After she passed, I wanted to continue living a life with no regret. And what I wanted to do most was to help people.

I decided to become either an Elder Care Manager or a Career Coach.

It was a hard choice. I felt strongly about what I saw and learned while caring for my mother, but I had always been a coaching manager at work. I didn’t want to throw that away — I wanted to use it and play to my strengths. I decided to become a Career Coach and started my practice in 2013.

I love it. And I’m able to use all the lessons I’ve learned from my career in the corporate world and as a caretaker. Here’s the lesson that sticks with me:

At some point, no matter what you do, or how you try to avoid it, you’re going to do something unbelievably stupid. The test is how you learn from it, how you recover and turn it into a positive.

There are always issues that create negative impacts on us personally or professionally. Instead of those issues, it’s about how you cope and overcome. This is what coaching is about. Forward momentum.

1 responses
daveadamsphotog
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Would be nice if you linked to the person you are using to promote Thumbtack® with..